Understanding Stroke Risk for Adults Under 55

In 2013, strokes dropped from the 4th to 5th leading cause of death in the United States. Although less people are dying in the US from strokes, this medical event still occurs every 40 seconds. Not only is that still a very high rate, but new research shows that strokes may actually be on the rise for people under 55. Multiple studies have been done in the United States that point to this trend, as well as in countries like France and Norway.

 

More Details About Strokes in Younger Adults

 

Before we look at why strokes may be on the rise in this specific age group, it’s worth putting the prevalence of this condition in the right context. While a stroke occurs in the United States every 40 seconds, only 10% of those cases occur with people between the age of 18 and 50. But just because that’s not a huge number of strokes in younger adults doesn’t mean this issue should be ignored.

 

According to the CDC, the same “traditional, modifiable” risk factors like high blood pressure, high cholesterol and obesity associated with strokes in older adults are also behind the increased number of strokes in younger adults. The specific type of stroke that seems to be increasing in this younger age group is an ischemic stroke.

 

An ischemic stroke is the most common type of stroke, and it occurs when the brain’s blood supply is cut off by a blockage. Based on the previously mentioned studies, there has been an increase in the annual number of younger adults admitted to hospitals for ischemic strokes. While this is an issue that needs to be taken seriously, there’s not necessarily a clear cause behind the increase.

 

Some doctors believe that the actual root of this increase is the number of diagnoses for strokes. The reason is modern imaging techniques like MRIs increase the likelihood of a doctor being able to correctly identify a stroke instead of misdiagnosing it as a migraine or seizure.

 

Additional studies are being done to see if and to what extent risk factors like hypertension and diabetes are contributing to strokes in younger adults who are in their thirties and forties.

 

How Adults Under 55 Can Protect Themselves

 

One reason that it’s important for younger adults to be aware of this trend is strokes are a condition that is largely preventable. By being aware of this condition from a younger age, individuals can take preventative action like changing to eating a diet rich in fruits and vegetables, exercising regularly, not smoking and keeping track of blood pressure. Medication can also play an important role in protecting younger adults who are especially at risk of suffering a stroke.

 

 

If you’re in need of ageneral checkup to learn more about vital signs like blood pressure or are require more specialized medical service likecardiology stress testing, you can count on Kaner Medical Group’s expert team to provide considerate and comprehensive medical care.

13 Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Heart Disease

Have you been diagnosed with a heart disease? Right now, you might be scared, confused, and desperate for answers. It’s okay. You’re not alone, and with a qualified medical team in your corner, you’ll get the best possible treatment for achieving optimal health. To better understand your condition and to get more peace of mind, it’s important that you ask the following questions of your heart doctor at your next appointment.

  1. What exactly is my condition?

  2. How severe is my heart disease?

  3. What’s the cause of my heart disease?

  4. What treatment do you recommend for my heart problem? Why?

  5. What are some realistic outcomes I can expect from treatment?

  6. Are there any possible side effects to the treatment you recommend?

  7. What are the consequences of not seeking treatment?

  8. What do I do if I notice my symptoms worsening?

  9. Is there anything I can do to manage my condition and keep it from worsening or coming back?

  10. How will my heart disease affect my day-to-day activities, like working, exercising, having sex, etc.?

  11. Should I change my diet?

  12. How does stress affect my condition, and what can I do to reduce my stress levels?

  13. How often will I need to come in for a doctor’s visit?

Being an educated patient plays an integral role in your recovery. The more you know, the better you can manage your condition and beat heart disease. Make sure you’re asking your doctor the right questions so you can have a productive conversation and learn everything you need to know to stay as healthy as you possibly can.

At Kaner Medical Group, we can work with you to treat your heart disease and manage even the most complex cardiac conditions. Our goal is to empower you to live a healthy, happy, life. Click here to learn more about our heart disease therapies.

Your Guide to February and National Heart Month

February is officially here, which means that in addition to celebrating Valentine’s and Presidents’ Day, there’s an important awareness effort going on in the form of National Heart Month. As the leading cause of death for both men and women in the United States, heart disease is an issue that all of us need to take very seriously.

To help play our part in spreading awareness during National Heart Month, Kaner Med wants to cover some of the steps you can take to help reduce your risk of heart disease and stroke:

1. Meet with a Doctor and Discuss Your Heart Health

While this is important for everyone to do, given that men are statistically less likely to visit a doctor for preventive care, it’s especially vital for them. One of the reasons that heart disease is still such a problem across the United States is it often builds up without creating any symptoms. By meeting with a doctor to talk about heart disease, you can find out if you’re at risk. And if you are, knowing this information will allow you to take action to help protect yourself.

2. Make Sleep a Priority

Supporting good heart health is one of the many benefits of consistently getting enough sleep. If you’re wondering how much sleep you should aim for every night, 7 hours is a great target. The reason to aim for that amount is research has found that young and middle-age adults who slept 7 hours a night had less calcium in their arteries than those who slept 5 hours or less and those who slept 9 hours or more.

3. Stop Smoking

Although everyone knows that smoking significantly contributes to your risk of heart disease, that doesn’t change the fact that more than 40 million adults in the US still smoke. So if you or a loved one are a smoker, the absolute best thing you can do for your heart and overall health in 2016 is stop smoking.

4. Consider the DASH or Mediterranean Diet

Many of the most popular diets and related books are focused on losing weight fast. The problem with almost all of those diets is they’re not sustainable. That means even if people are able to lose a little weight, they’re almost guaranteed to gain it back. Two exceptions to that rule are the DASH and Mediterranean diets. While these diets can help you lose weight, they’re actually sustainable approaches to eating. Best of all, they’ve both been linked to supporting heart health.

5. Less Sitting, More Sweating

You should try to exercise for 150 minutes a week. That amount comes from exercising 30 minutes a day, 5 times a week. However, it’s also important to make an effort to move around more when you’re at the office or home. Standing up more frequently and moving around can do a lot to help your overall heart health.

By putting these steps into action during February and maintaining them over time, you can help keep your heart at its healthiest!

13 Questions to Ask Your Doctor about Heart Disease

Have you been diagnosed with a heart disease? Right now, you might be scared, confused, and desperate for answers. It’s okay. You’re not alone, and with a qualified medical team in your corner, you’ll get the best possible treatment for achieving optimal health. To better understand your condition and to get more peace of mind, it’s important that you ask the following questions of your heart doctor at your next appointment.

 

  1. What exactly is my condition?

  2. How severe is my heart disease?

  3. What’s the cause of my heart disease?

  4. What treatment do you recommend for my heart problem? Why?

  5. What are some realistic outcomes I can expect from treatment?

  6. Are there any possible side effects to the treatment you recommend?

  7. What are the consequences of not seeking treatment?

  8. What do I do if I notice my symptoms worsening?

  9. Is there anything I can do to manage my condition and keep it from worsening or coming back?

  10. How will my heart disease affect my day-to-day activities, like working, exercising, having sex, etc.?

  11. Should I change my diet?

  12. How does stress affect my condition, and what can I do to reduce my stress levels?

  13. How often will I need to come in for a doctor’s visit?

 

Being an educated patient plays an integral role in your recovery. The more you know, the better you can manage your condition and beat heart disease. Make sure you’re asking your doctor the right questions so you can have a productive conversation and learn everything you need to know to stay as healthy as you possibly can.

At Kaner Medical Group, we can work with you to treat your heart disease and manage even the most complex cardiac conditions. Our goal is to empower you to live a healthy, happy, life. Click here to learn more about our heart disease therapies.

 

 

A Healthy Weight Helps You Have A Healthy Heart

Heart disease is the nation’s #1 killer, and while there are a number of causes of heart disease, one of the best things you can do to prevent heart disease and improve your cardiovascular health is to maintain a healthy weight. Studies have shown that exercises regularly and following a healthy diet can significantly improve heart health.

 

Make no mistake – being overweight or obese raises your risk for heart disease (along with a number of other diseases). Unfortunately, more than two-thirds of adults in the United States are considered overweight or obese, and nearly 36% are classified as obese.

 

 

The good news is there are steps you can take to losing weight and maintaining a healthy weight, and as soon as you start losing weight, you’ll be immediately reducing your risks for heart disease and a variety of other diseases, while also gaining more energy and improving your self-confidence and overall happiness.

 

How to Lose Weight and Keep it Off

 

Most diets fail. That’s just the cold, hard truth. Some dieters initially lose weight, but the vast majority gain it back and then some. It’s important to change the way you think about weight loss. It’s not just about focusing on losing weight. It’s about making small, sustainable changes to your lifestyle, like eating a little better and being more active, that will help you be more successful at losing weight and keeping it off.

 

To start, we suggest reading our articles “How to Keep Weight Off for Good” and “5 Ways You Can Eat Healthier in the New Year”. Both of these articles are loaded with helpful tips, tricks, and information that will get you on the path to losing weight permanently.

In addition, there are a few other important tips you should keep in mind when losing weight for health.

 

  • Make sure your goals are realistic and safe. Losing 1-2 pounds each week is reasonable and safe.
  • Make sustainable changes to your lifestyle that you can maintain for life. Totally depriving yourself of foods you enjoy and making yourself miserable will end in failure eventually.
  • Educate yourself on what you’re really eating. The more you understand about the food you’re putting into your body, the healthier the choices you’ll be able to make.
  • Get encouragement and support from your health care provider.
  • Reward yourself for making progress with something other than food (e.g. a spa day, a movie, etc.).

 

At Kaner Medical Group, our team of experts is here to support you in living a healthier, happier life. We work with patients who want to lose weight, keep it off, and be healthy.  

5 Tips for Better Heart Health

Heart disease is still the nation’s #1 killer. Every year, approximately 787,000 people die from heart disease. Every 34 seconds, someone has a heart attack. According to The Heart Foundation, “Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people of most racial/ethnic groups in the United States, including African Americans, Hispanics and Whites. For Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders and American Indians or Alaska Natives, heart disease is second only to cancer.”

It doesn’t matter who you are – male, female, white, African American, young, old—heart disease is something you need to take seriously. It’s deadly and it doesn’t discriminate. However, you can limit your risks for heart disease by making some simple, healthy lifestyle choices.

Here are some easy ways you can treat your heart right.

  1. Stop smoking— Smoking is a dangerous habit any way you look at it. Not only can it lead to lung cancer, but it’s also one of the biggest controllable risk factors for heart disease. Kicking this addiction to the curb, while difficult, can significantly lower your risk for heart disease.
  2. Maintain a healthy weight— More than 2/3 of adults are considered to be overweight or obese. Carrying around extra pounds can increase your chances of getting heart disease. As your body mass index increase, so does your risk for coronary heart disease. Shed the pounds and maintain a healthy weight to keep your heart happy.
  3. Eat right— This goes hand-in-hand with the previous point. While you need to make sure you’re not consuming too many calories, you also need to pay attention to what you’re eating. Foods rich in antioxidants can help fight off disease. In addition, make sure you’re getting enough healthy omega-3 fatty acids (salmon and other fish are great sources!). Also, the Mayo Clinic says that adding soluble fiber to your diet can help you reduce your bad cholesterol. 
  4. Get moving— According to the American Heart Association, “Being physically active is important to prevent heart disease and stroke.” They suggest at least 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise for good heart health. Time to get moving!
  5. See your doctor— When was the last time you had a complete checkup? If you haven’t visited your doctor in a while, now is a good time to schedule an appointment. Routine heart health exams can go a long way to keeping you on track for a long, healthy life.

For all your healthcare needs, Kaner Medical Group is here to help. We strive to help our patients achieve healthier, happier lifestyles. Learn more at www.KanerMed.com

13 Shocking Facts about Heart Disease in the United States

February is American Heart Month, a time to focus on the very real and very deadly heart disease epidemic that has been ravaging our nation. While you have probably already heard that heart disease is the #1 killer in America, the extent and severity of the epidemic doesn’t fully register with most people until they or a loved one have to deal with heart disease.

To put into perspective just how pervasive and deadly heart disease really is in America, we’ve compiled a list of some truly shocking, sobering statistics.

1. About 600,000 people die of heart disease in America each year. That’s about 1 out of every 4 deaths.

2. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people of most racial/ethnic groups in the United States, including African Americans, Hispanics and Whites. For Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders and American Indians or Alaska Natives, heart disease is second only to cancer.

3. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women.

4. 1 in 3 women’s deaths each year is the result of heart disease. 

5. An estimated 43 million women in the U.S. have heart disease.

6. Heart diseases claim more lives than all forms of cancer combined.

7. Every 34 seconds, an American has a heart attack.

8. Every 60 seconds, someone in the U.S. dies from a heart disease-related event.

9. An estimated 720,000 Americans suffer heart attacks each year.

10. The direct and indirect costs of heart disease add up to more than $320.1 billion.

11. About half of all Americans have at least one of the 3 key risk factors for heart disease – high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol, and smoking.

12. 35% of heart disease deaths are due to physical inactivity.

13. Coronary heart disease is the most common form of heart disease, claiming almost 380,000 lives every year.

Hopefully, these statistics have shown you just how serious heart disease really is. Please, take the initiative to limit your risks for heart disease. Eat right, exercise regularly, maintain a healthy weight, and ditch dangerous habits like smoking. Doing these simple things can go a long way to achieving greater heart health.

For all your healthcare needs, Kaner Medical Group is here to help. We strive to help our patients achieve healthier, happier lifestyles. Learn more at www.KanerMed.com.